The Reason For That Annoying Cloud Layer This Week

A stationary area of high pressure has meant that we’ve had dry and stable weather during the past week, with temperatures up to 27 °C on Wednesday, but a persistent layer of cloud has spoilt what would otherwise have been wall-to-wall sunshine for many. Aren’t high pressure systems meant to mean cloudless skies, so what caused this frequent cloud? Ironically, the answer is the strength of the high pressure itself and how it traps moisture underneath it!

MODIS Aqua satellite image at 1235 UTC, 21 June 2014.
MODIS Aqua satellite image at 1235 UTC, 21 June 2014.

In a standard atmosphere, temperature normally falls with height, at a rate of around 6.5 °C/km. Air warmed at the surface rises and cools, forming clouds. It will continue to rise as long as it’s warmer (less dense) than its suroundings.
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Your 2014 Brazil World Cup Weather Guide

Brazilian fansWith less than two weeks to go to the start of the tournament maybe it’s time to look at how the weather may affect the players, especially those from more temperate climes. Much has been said about the effect that high temperatures and humidity will have, but in some cases it may not be as bad as some might think, especially for evening kick-offs. Still, it is a handy excuse to have at the ready if the result of the match goes the wrong way!
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